Welsh songs, and a clogging class in North Wales!

I am loving adding to my vocab by singing along to welsh songs… Carys Matthews cd ‘hullabaloo’ has some fantastic trad folk songs on, with words in the booklet. Cyfryr gafr (counting goats) is a classic! Also went to my first clog dancing class last night (last Monday of the month, Mold) and it was fantastic and in simple welsh!

Ps is this a new forum? Sorry if I have to categorised correctly, I couldn’t see how

Nope, no need to worry about categories! Although we will be adding tagging in the future…:slight_smile:

That sounds as though you’ve got some great stuff going on - if you link Welsh to things that you enjoy, it’ll make the whole process much more entertaining, and much more likely to be successful!

Fiona Hopkins: I am loving adding to my vocab by singing along to welsh songs.

I love doing that too, for vocab and for making word combinations start to come naturally. :slight_smile:

What I’ve found is that very traditional folk songs, as well as anything written by Dafydd Iwan (!), tend to have more formal grammar than more modern stuff, and so to be a bit harder to unravel. I have a suggestion though for a wonderful sing-along CD, which has some traditional and some not-traditional stuff:
[Pws Mewn Pyb] (http://www.sadwrn.com/eng/Dewi-Pws/Pws-Mewn-Pyb), by Dewi Pws
It’s also on iTunes and etcetera, but if you buy the CD, you get an insert with all the lyrics. :slight_smile:

Sorry if it has already been mentioned on here, but there is a new series with Cerys Matthews on S4C about the story of folk songs “Y Goeden Falad” - available on Clic. I have only watched the first episode so far but really enjoyed it.

https://www.s4c.co.uk/clic/e_level2.shtml?programme_id=515118520

I really enjoying that too jean. And Diane I will get that… If only to hear the bing bong song which ruined a welsh lesson with hysteria… My welsh teacher all her life has been convinced it was a famous silly English song and couldn’t believe that we didn’t know it… She kept thinking we were having her on and saying ‘no, really…’ . Can’t wait to hear it and then sing it to her!

Really glad to hear you’re enjoying yourself, Fiona. As Aran has already said, I think that when you manage to combine Welsh with another activity you enjoy, you’re on to a winner. I was reading a blog recently by someone who gave this advice to learners: Find something you like doing and do it in Welsh. Pretty spot on, I think. Pob lwc with the rest of the classes.

Enjoying the Cerys Matthews series too. Hoping to get Hullabaloo before long, and Tir also. A couple of weeks ago, I’d never heard ‘Moliannwn’ before, and now it’s in my head all the time! I’ve worked out the chords on my ukulele, so future fellow-bootcampers, be warned!

Jon Thomas (cwmgoch): A couple of weeks ago, I’d never heard ‘Moliannwn’ before, and now it’s in my head all the time!

Then I’m not sure if I should point out that a pleasantly-raucous version of Moliannwn is the very first song in the album Pws Mewn Pyb that I linked above. :slight_smile:

Something happened the other day that reinforces what I wrote above:

Fiona Hopkins: I am loving adding to my vocab by singing along to welsh songs.

Diane Owen (Tahl): I love doing that too, for vocab and for making word combinations start to come naturally. :slight_smile:

I was writing something with a string of adjectives and couldn’t remember whether, if you’d had to mutate the first one in the string, you should mutate the others as well.

I solved the problem by singing the chorus of 'Hei Mistar Urdd’ to myself ('Hei Mistar Urdd, yn dy goch, gwyn, a gwyrdd…") Answer: Nope, mutate only the first one. :slight_smile: And if you don’t know the song, watch this video, but be warned it’s a real earworm:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fUpOeH7mfY