Anthem dyffryn nantlle

Does anyone have the words to this beautiful song about the Nantlle Valley in Gwynedd please?

Maybe Aran knows them or someone who does.

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There’s an old facebook page run by the writer(s).
Maybe they will answer a message?
https://www.facebook.com/Anthem-Dyffryn-Nantlle-362347580631763/

I did look on there but as no one had posted on that page for over 6 years I decided this forum was a better bet.
Thanks though :smile:

I’ve messaged the page and they’re sending the words along :slight_smile:
I’ll post them here as soon as I’ve got them.

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oh wow well done you. I didn’t get a response!! Diolch

Lovely song

Here you go:
Geiriau gan/Words by Karen Owen:

Pan ma’r arwr mewn ffilm isho rhedag i ffwrdd,
mae o’n pacio ei fag, a rhoi’r goriad ar 'bwrdd;
am fod bywyd bob amser yn ffitio i un cês,
y darnau uffernol a’r “gwd old dês”.

Y dillad, y lluniau, bob sws a bob ffeit,
y ffrind fuodd yn ffeind, a’r holl jibars teit;
mi wasgith y teulu, troi cefn ar y gwaith,
achos mynd mae o isho, ac antur 'di’r daith.

Cytgan:
Ond denig 'di hynny, o hyd ac o hyd,
am bod fama, medda f’ynta’n meddwl diawl o ddim byd;
nes y sylwith yn diwadd bod y gorwel yn grwn,
ac y landith o’n ôl yn y dyffryn hwn.

Cau’r drws a chloi’i galon, rhoi winc bach i’r sêr,
ac os bydd 'na amser, rhyw “Sori” blêr;
mae bywyd rhy fyr i ddifaru yn hir,
ac mae’n coelio ei glwydda ei hun, dyna’r gwir.

Cytgan:
Ond denig 'di hynny, o hyd ac o hyd,
am bod fama, medda f’ynta’n meddwl diawl o ddim byd;
nes sylwith yn diwadd bod y gorwel yn grwn,
ac y landith o’n ôl yn y dyffryn hwn.

Nid ffilm ydi bywyd, nid arwr 'di o,
a fedar o’m smalio na ‘sgynno fo’m co’;
mi ddalltith wrth wagio’i atgofion yn rhes,
dydi’r petha pwysica’m yn ffitio’n y cês.

Hope that helps.

That’s great! Diolch Thomas :smile:

However I thought the words would be about the valley, they’re a bit weird when translated with the help of google

When the hero in a movie wants to run away,
he packs his bag, and puts the key on a table;
because life always fits into one suitcase,
the hellish bits and the “old dog”.

The clothes, the pictures, every suit and every outfit,
the friend who found him, and all the jibars;
I will press the family, abandon the work,
because he wants to go, and an adventure on the trip.

Chorus:
But attract that, always and still,
because mama, I think she’s a devilish thinker of nothing;
until it becomes clear that the horizon is round,
and the landfall back in this valley.

Close the door and lock her heart, give the stars a little wink,
and if there is time, some messy “Sorry”;
life is too short to regret long,
and he believes his own glory, that’s it.

Chorus:
But attract that, always and still,
because mama, I think she’s a devilish thinker of nothing;
until the horizon is finally noticed,
and the landfall back in this valley.

Life is not a movie, it’s not a hero,
can I pretend not to scold me;
blindly emptying her memories in a row,
my weight doesn’t fit in the suitcase.

:laughing:
Oops - hope it hasn’t ruined it for you :wink:
Also… I would exercise caution with google-translate, as I’m sure you do… For instance, ‘gwd old des’ is definitely a Cymraeg-ification of ‘good old days’ rather than something about a dog :).

haha I know google translate can be very inaccurate and confusing but even so the words are weird. I cant see the relevance to calling it “anthem dyffryn nantlle” tbh. Its still a beautiful tune tho :smile:

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I will resist the temptation to rush a translation (or possibly to attempt one at all in Saesneg … some stuff just doesn’t have the same “feel” in a foreign (to the location) tongue …

But I read the gist as a “Film Hero / Superstar” character, realising in the end that all the glitz is fake and the real stuff that matters is back Home (in this case in Dyffryn Nantlle). The stage props and stuff may fit in a suitcase but Real Life is deeper than that.

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My maternal side of the family are all from Dyffryn Nantlle and which has to be one of the most if not THE MOST Welsh Speaking areas of Wales.
If you ever visit the small town of Pen Y Groes, you will rarely if ever hear English spoken in everyday conversation.
The local dialect ('Tafodiaith) is classical North West Wales in that they change final ‘e’ vowels in many words to the letter ‘a’, hence words such as ‘Capel’ and ‘Cacen’ become ‘Capal’ and ‘Cacan’.
My mother was born in the biblically named village of ‘Nasareth’ and which sits in the shadow of the Arfon TV Mast or ‘Polyn Nebo’ as it is known locally. This mast is the tallest structure in Wales, standing some 1,050 feet and was completed in the year of my own birth in 1962.
As the video depicts, a beautifully rural and idyllic area. A walk around the haunting landscape of Llyn Cwm Dulyn is peace and tranquility personified.

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