Thoughts from anyone who finished SSiCornish?

Splann (and the equivalent in the five other Celtic languages, if only I knew them…) :sun_with_face:

I’m keeping my fingers crossed most of all for more SSi Cornish, but wouldn’t mind trying a bit of Breton!

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Unfortunately untill funding is sorted a lot of the work on the Cornish language will be done by volunteers I expect

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Yup, sadly likely to be the case.

Aran, do you know the situation with the Cornish volunteers? Is there already a dedicated group preparing new material? Maybe it’s a secret at the moment. :wink: But, any news is exciting stuff.

There are a couple of good lads who were working with us previously who have said that they want to push on with the project - but the translator has been ill recently - I gather he’s better now, though, so I’m hoping it won’t be all that long until we have some more stuff for you… :slight_smile:

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Just a quick update for everyone: we have both been swamped of late organising new work and keeping language friends in play. Our Gorsedh and Akademi are all running on 0 funding but we (Pol and I) have decided to keep SSiC alive. We have decided that we no longer have to worry what the council intended for the course and are happy to be open about our intentions to work on new material. We are determined to keep this alive but would only ask that people are understanding that our inputs will be sporadic.

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Thanks, Mike. I met Pol recently and had a good chat with him about the course (and the immeasurable superiority of Camborne over Redruth :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:) and he did assure me you’d be keeping on as best you can, despite the complete lack of funding. I’m so glad to hear that, as SSiC is such a great way to get into speaking a new language and learning to put new sentences together naturally from the basic elements — it’s done a huge amount for me in just getting to grips with Kernewek and gaining confidence in using even the little I can. I’m very grateful to you, Pol and everyone else who’s keeping SSiC afloat.

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Thanks for that. In the mean we need to keep pushing the petition. It may not change government policy any time soon but every little helps

!https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/128474

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… as they say at Tesco! :wink: It’s true, though — and, possibly thanks to the extra publicity we had around the Man Engine over the past week, the petition is now over 10,000 signatures! Which means the government at least has to give an official response to it, whether or not it makes any difference as yet.

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Back to the original topic of the thread, I’ve just redone Challenges 9 and 10, which I’d only done once before. Not quite as hard as I remembered, but then, I’ve been learning more Kernewek elsewhere since I last practised with SSiC.

I do have a concern that there are a few anomalies in the later challenges as well — for example, “I’ve started” is first given as “My re dhallethas” in Challenge 9, but by Challenge 10, it sounds like “My re dhallathas” (and I don’t think it’s just Pol’s accent, as Julia does the same). Similarly, in Challenge 9 we’re taught “My re bia” for “I’ve been…”, but in Challenge 10 it’s said as “My re beu”. (I know I’ve seen both in written Kernewek at times, but I don’t know what the difference is, if any. Kernewek has so many forms of the verb “to be”, it makes my head spin. :dizzy_face:)

I’m also wondering about where and how to use “bos edhomm dhymm” (Challenge 9) as opposed to “yth yw res dhymm” (Challenge 10), and whether there’s any real difference between “My a omlowenha kewsel” and “My a omlowenha ow kewsel” (again, we hear one in one challenge, one in the other)… but I guess it will all come clear eventually.

Looking forward to the future challenges, even if they do seem to be coming, well, dreckly! :wink:

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Thanks for the update :slight_smile: I actually never made it to the end (I know, I lost the momentum :frowning:) so I can’t attest to your questions regarding lessons 9 & 10. Hopefully we do see the future material, and if there are any discrepancies then they are also cleared up. :slight_smile: Good thing you left your questions for Pol and Julia to read.

I believe it should be “my re dhallathas” with -a- – this is the form in my Common Cornish and Unified Cornish verb books.

[quote=“Courtenay, post:31, topic:4453”]Similarly, in Challenge 9 we’re taught “My re bia” for “I’ve been…”, but in Challenge 10 it’s said as “My re beu”. (I know I’ve seen both in written Kernewek at times, but I don’t know what the difference is, if any. Kernewek has so many forms of the verb “to be”, it makes my head spin. :dizzy_face:)
[/quote]

“My re beu” is “I have been” (perfect tense), “My re bia” is “I had been” (pluperfect tense).

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Oh good — that’s very helpful, thanks, @philipnewton. :slight_smile: I’m at the stage where I could do with learning more Kernewek grammar properly.

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I was also confused about the ‘my re bia’ vs ‘my re beu’ but I just went ahead with it using ‘my re bia’ as it was explained and given in the vocabulary. I thought maybe ‘my re beu’ was an optional change, but I still do not know. This was my top question regarding the course.

Sorry. I am new here, and only just saw the explanation above. Many thanks.

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Thanks for explaining that. I will be starting lesson 10 shortly. I’ll undo in my head what I learnt in lesson 9, but keep it parked for whenever it might be needed.