So few Welsh speakers

What a shame you couldn’t come just a tiny bit further west to Llandysul! Lots of Welsh spoken around here :slight_smile:

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Or to Llandeilo. When we visited back in October we heard and spoke to lots of Welsh speakers.

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Not related to the topic but can anybody explain the language working here.
Dwi’m mynd = I am going - There isn’t any softening.
So why Pan dwi’n ddiflas = I am bored = There is a softening?
In ssiw there appears no softening after dwi’n…
But in the children’s book Lliwiau Hapus these softenings appear more than once,
Diolch yn fawr

Mynd is a verb, diflas is an adjective. Verbs don’t soften after yn, lots of other things do.

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OK - that looks like it fits the pattern. Much appreciated

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You might be looking for this thread :slight_smile:

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I have a map from the mid 1800s showing that Brecon was an English bubble within a Welsh-speaking area that stretched all the way east to Talgarth and the Black Mountains.
Two things were at work, I think. Firstly Brecon was and is a garrison town with a significant population of English soldiers, and secondly it was and is the biggest market town for many miles around. Right down the eastern side of Wales it was often the case that English speakers would travel across the border to trade at markets and the Welsh found early on that they needed to speak English to both service these customers and avoid getting ripped off - legal niceties were invariably conducted in English and you didn’t want to find that your ignorance of the thin language had landed you at the wrong end of an unfair contract.
Going further back to the middle ages, most of the towns in this area, like Brecon and Builth, were actually established by the crown and/or the marcher lords as English trading islands in a Welsh sea, the Welsh themselves being considered to be untrustworthy in trade.
By the way, there’s loads of Welsh in and around Llanymddyfri, though it’s not always visible to visitors.

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Beautifully explained!!!

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It’s also worth considering how much you can miss the wood for the trees in Wales. It’s best not to judge based on initial language used. In Aberteifi (very Welsh area) I often asked (whilst on bootcamp and unable to use English) if the person behind the counter spoke Welsh. From then I was off. However, I could have easily felt as you did in Llanymddyfri. I could have obliviously sailed through town without knowing.

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I was coming back from Gatwick with my wife & grown-up family on Saturday, and we stopped at a large motorway service station (name forgotten) on the M25. Large place with lots of different food outlets. We went off to get our respective beverages and food, and met up again at a table in the middle. My son had been to a McDonalds, evidently with a self-service option (didn’t see it myself), which apparently offered a Welsh language option! I was impressed!

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I’m afraid not even that would induce me to eat soggy hamburgers!

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Yup. McDonalds offers several language options on its machines and one of them is Welsh. They were obviously smart enough to realise that a) they were going to need a Welsh option in at least a few of their UK ‘restaurants’ and b) it would be cheapest and simplest to install the same set-up in all stores.
I’m still boycotting them since they stopped selling root beer in 1987*, though.

*This is a guess.

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I’m still boycotting them since, just after I left university, I briefly worked in a slaughterhouse. 'nuff said.

(and it’s so easy to make homemade burger’s etc that I wouldn’t go now anyway, Welsh or no Welsh!)

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Oh, they’ve stopped selling that poison, have they? Maybe it’s time for me to reconsider my boycott…:wink:

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But, on the food theme, we’ve just made some coffee toffee by accident (was meant to be experimental coffee fudge)
Still, it tasted nice, so would that be ‘Dw i’n hoffi toffi coffi’?

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Naaaah! (We’ve boycotted since eldest, now 23, did a project on the rainforest at primary school. Have never missed it and now don’t eat any kind of fast food apart from the occasional ‘proper’ fish & chips.)

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Sssshhh, it was a joke (the idea being that if I’ve been boycotting them since before 1987, I wouldn’t be about to change now)…:wink:

Based on a slight myth - I’m not sure when I woke up enough to switch to a permanent boycott. Wasn’t back in '87, though.

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And the ‘slow on the uptake award’ goes to…

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Catrin tells me that my jokes (which she always says with her inverted commas tone of voice) are an acquired taste. Actually, that’s when she’s feeling generous…

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That sounds eerily like something many of my students would say.

eg “knock knock”, “who’s there?”, “doorbell repairman”

however my all time favourite put down as a teacher followed the usual moan in a maths class “sir, when am i ever going to use this again?” to which i replied “in your resit”. :slight_smile:

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