Sgwrs 20 (Advanced Content) Spoiler Alert!

Hi all - a South Walian today, discussing rural shows, hens and Welsh corgis, among other stuff! Enjoy!

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I enjoyed that, but won’t comment on the South Walian accent and dialect, except that I managed to pick up on the variable pronunciation of wyau.

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Well that was a good one for me. I had a good understanding of that on first listen. :+1:

The words that I didn’t know were mostly guessable or not show stoppers - probably good fortune - but I’ll take it! :wink:

I didn’t quite understand the lottery thing with the land but actually I don’t think that was a language thing - I just don’t think I’m clear as to what happened - in English or Welsh! :roll_eyes: not a problem wrth gwrs.

Learned a couple of words for different types of horse…didn’t remember fox but it was guessable- knew the dog words as have two myself.

…I was very surprised by the hen that laid blue eggs !!!.. (I thought that was going to be another killer bees situation) but no, the hen did lay blue eggs…well there you go! :smile:

I didn’t quite understand about the corgi hair ending up in the human food - I thought it was some sort of issue feeding the dogs! Ah well

But nevertheless, a good week for me - I’m going to chalk it up!

I hope everyone else got on well or made good progress too.

Rich :slight_smile:

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Yes the lottery thing wasn’t clear anyway, it was a new one on me!
Yep - actual blue eggs - who knew?!

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Somewhat bizarrely, I managed to find “Dob” as an Autralian/NZ English word:
2 dob something in Contribute money to a common cause.
‘everyone dobbed in a few dollars’
The online dictionary came complete with sound recording in OZ :slight_smile:

@Deborah-SSi
Is that right?

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Struggled with this on first listen, but picked up a lot mote after reading the trawsgriff. (More words I didn’t know in the trawsgriff too - apparently I’m better with politics than rural life!),

One thing that made me sit up: her comment about using star instead of grisau. It made me realise that my Gog family used ‘cwtch dan star’ to mean cupboard under the stairs. An Anglesey thing? Or just an oddity of my family?

(I imagine the dog hair is the product of a waggy tailed dog with longish hair shedding absolutely everywhere. Happens to us all the time!)

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Cwtsh Dan Star not usually used in the Gog at all, it’s usually Twll Dan Grisia. Any history of south walians in your family?

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Ha, ha, that sounds like your talking about some sort of illness!!! :smile: :smile:

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:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl: I couldn’t possibly comment!!! (i jest, of course!)

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No. We’re very Gog. Back to the middle of the 19thC on both sides of my mum’s family at least. But I asked my mum tonight and she said they used it a bit as a joke name. So maybe making fun of South Welsh a bit?

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Ah! Perhaps they’ve been watching too much Pobol y Cwm…!

Oh this goes back to when I was growing up - long before Pobl y Cwm. I fact to when my mum was growing up, which was before television!

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Thanks Rich, very helpful feedback for all of us :hugs:

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Thanks for the interesting feedback. It will help me when I listen to it :slightly_smiling_face:

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Each of these conversations Is a little gold mine for learners. There are obviously new words you don’t know each week - part of the process- but also words you do know that are used in a different way…it’s an opportunity to tap into natural speech…

I had not heard gwr used for anything but husband before but understand it is a more polite form and that ‘dyn’ Is very literal, verging on ‘male’ in English … and not a way to politely refer to someone, certainty in your presence…interesting.

I had also not heard of ‘mwy o faint’ to mean larger…it makes sense of course…maint is an interesting/ versatile word isn’t it?

It’s these points of interest that really help the learning process - the fact they are part and parcel of a natural conversation makes it very powerful.

Rich :slight_smile:

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That is one meaning that I’ve heard used casually in NZ and Oz, yes, but I’m not sure how common it is. I don’t think it’s used a lot.

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The only use of ‘dob’ I’ve heard is to ‘dob someone in’, i.e to grass someone up. Interesting.

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Awww, it’s Friday again and I barely finished listening to this! :open_mouth:

I had to catch up on a few things after being away for a week; but I also miss the pressure and boost I got from knowing I’d go to Wales soon and would have to speak Welsh somehow; and talking to people in person and being connected with the language in everyday life.
I guess I really have to start planning another trip there! :grin:

Anyway. In general I think it’s a bit easier to understand more details of the content when there are fewer topics, and more in depth like in this case (especially dogs!), and I enjoyed the Sgwrs!

The accent is clear, but there were words that I’m kinda familiar with that she seems to pronounce oddly, and I didn’t catch.
For example, eggs (I expected pronounced like “wiai” - so at least I didn’t worry about them being blue!) and horses: I have in mind horse like ceffil, while the y often sounds more like an e here.
This also caused me to think that she was talking about astronomy, or a story about looking at the stars when out in the countryside, while they were actually the horses names!!

Funny sounds of the day:

  • pori sounds exactly like porri, that’s leeks/cennin in Italian (although it’s written like Italian for pores). :smiley:
  • I thought I heard “thriller” at least a couple of times (maybe because Michael Jackson’s in the news a lot recently?). Turns out it was drelar. I have to admit, once again, seeing it written doesn’t help me understand more because I’d expect the e to sound more like Italian e…maybe not always or maybe it’s accent?

But at least, I’m now ready for next one! :slight_smile:

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That was my thought too; and perhaps more schoolkid usage than gangland. :slight_smile:

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I agree with @Deborah-SSi It’s uncommon. To ‘dob’ is more commonly used in vernacular conversation to indicate ‘informing’ or ‘telling’ generally to someone else’s detriment. E.g. If you pull her hair I’ll dob! (tell someone in authority… Like a parent of teacher) OR ‘Yeh…I dobbed him in to the police’.

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