Passive listening resources

I am still very new but am loving learning Welsh.
In order to be exposed and train my ears and brain work “yn Gymrag” I would love to find some resources (ideally downloadable and free) for the following:

  • Childrens nursery rhyme type songs.
  • Podcasts in Welsh or a mix of Welsh and English. Not terribly picky about the topics.
  • Other passive listening sources.
  • I know there are some BBCRadio feeds available online. If I’m not really interested in pop music with announcements in Welsh, what other options are there?

I have been listening to the Psalms in Welsh from here:

Thanks!

3 Likes

Radio Cymru isn’t all pop music, by any means, and there are podcasts.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/radiocymru

Beibl.net is excellent!

It’s always worth having a random browse around Youtube, and indeed Soundcloud, to see what you can find.

3 Likes

Thanks a bunch!
Sorry, I didn’t mean to imply it was all pop music. Any speciific shows or feeds on Radio Cymru you’d recommend?

1 Like

I like to listen to Pigion: Highlights for Welsh Learners, and Beti a’i Phobol… There are some podcasts of stories for children, too, although I haven’t listened to those.

2 Likes

I’m liking Bore Cothi at the moment. It’s 2 hours long, more chat than songs, with plenty of stories and conversation thrown in.

2 Likes

I’ve just had a look at the website and was pleasantly surprised to find that a friend of mine was responsible for the web site design.

2 Likes

R. Cymru: Well, I like the discussion programmes, like “Dan Yr Wyneb”, “John Walter”, and “O’r Bae”. They get quite heated sometimes which is fun (when one isn’t directly involved).

Also (although I’m no businessman), I like Gari Wyn’s business programme, because he is so enthusiastic.

(I don’t mean to imply that I always understand all of these programmes…but I gradually (and slowly) pick up more and more words, and slowly it begins to make sense. :slight_smile:

I also look out for the occasional drama’s and comedies or light-hearted quiz programmes.

(And although it’s not on at the moment, when it comes back, check out “Y Talwrn” - a competition of bards).

If you like nature, look out for anything by Iolo Williams (on S4C as well of course).

Pob lwc. :slight_smile:

3 Likes

Wow! Well done for taking this vital step so early in your learning process. It’s vital because lsitening skills nearly always lag speaking skills, so the eralier you start listening, the earlier you’ll start developing the other (most important) part of conversation skilss.

So, good luck with finding stuff that suits you, and remember - you know that you’re skills are really improving when you start to develop preferences between different speakers, and alater, differetn subjects.! We used to joke about one particular programme that the big “milestone” to reach was understanding enough to realise how boring the show was! That’s probably true of any show that you would never listen to in English, but will happily have on in the background because it’s in Welsh…

If you’re brave, and looking for some interesting, though possibly totally unintelligible stuff, it’s worth having a look at www.RadioBeca.Cymru

About halfway down the home page, there’s a box marked “gwrandpo” (listen), which will take you to a page full of large circles. Click on any of them, and you’ll get access to previous broadcasts on this internet station. Clicking on “BydBeca” top right of the page will take you to the same place.

I recommend “Browlan Beca” (the first circle) which takes you to archived live shows (the live shows run every Saturday morning at the moment). They are about an hours and a half long. If you’re interested in Beibl.net, then you may find the nearly 5 minutes of an annibynwr (Welsh independent chapels) service, the first item in “Bach o Bopeth” interesting.

Let us know what you think of the stuff that you’re hearing - that would be a great help to other people in your situation!

And remember - as you get further into your learning, you’ll start to understand more and more. But, the more you understand, the more frustrating it can be for a while. Remember that the end point is understanding everything, and that most of the middle will be understanding enough to realise how little you understand. Don;t get put off by the apparent drawback of the process - it is a process that will always work in the end, as long as you stick to it!

4 Likes

Depending where abouts you are you might find lots of kids songs/story discs in the library

Thanks for the specific directions. Really helped.

I was telling my wife as we watched Y Gwyll (Albeit in English on Netflix) that I could hear the direct connection between the Welsh I am learning and the sound of Welsh-accented English.

You may want to give Stori Tic Toc a try. They are fiveish minute children’s stories. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b054b8f3

1 Like

Although not free there is an album of nursery rhymes available on Amazon called Babi bach. It’s really nice and does everything in English and Welsh. It’s also only available to download rather than on CD.

I’m just listening again to Gari Wyn on Radio Cymru (Mondays, 12:00), e.g.

…and am struck again by what a good clear speaker of Northern Welsh he is (no idea exactly where he comes from, but I think SSiW northern course learners especially would feel at home listening to him).