Cynghanedd and the Cadair

Hi all- there is a great introduction to cynghanedd on the Conversation- https://theconversation.com/how-the-welsh-developed-their-own-form-of-poetry-73299

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The ‘About Welsh’ course will be running in June and Sept 2018. I’m booked onto the June one, can’t wait!

I had the same thought this year, having found the Crown poems on the Eisteddfod website but not the Cadair. Thanks to this thread, I bought this year’s Cyfansoddiadau, Clwed Cynghanedd and Singing in Chains from Gwales.com - and they have just arrived! Waaay beyond my abilities at the moment but, like a mother buying school uniform, I am hoping I will grow into them!!

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I don’t think so @Catriona. I bought ‘Singing in Chains’ last year and got so fired up by it that I thought I’d write an englyn. It took me about six weeks to write four lines which is probably rhigwm doggerel anyway, but I learned a lot of new vocabulary on the way.

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Ah, well. That gives me hope. I can have fun trying anyway!

One thing that confused me - I listened to the Cadair ceremony in the radio, and I thought I’d undergo that part of it was a reading of the winning poem. So when I got my copy of the Cyfansoddiadau i thought I’d listen again and try to follow along with the text. But it didn’t match up, except in little fragments. So I’ve obviously misunderstood. I guess it was someone talking about the poem?

Can anyone enlightened a bemused relative beginner?

I haven’t heard the ceremony, but usually they don’t read the whole poem - they talk about it and say which bits really impressed the judges and why, and stuff like that, so that’s probably what you heard.

PS If you listen to Talwrn y Beirdd on Radio Cymru, they do a similar thing with the poems on there. :slight_smile:

Diolch, Siaron. That would certainly make sense