Anyone else doing the Cornish course?

Usi dha gi ow tyski Kernewek ynwedh (is your dog learning Cornish too)? :grin: :wink:

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Shhhh! He doesn’t know yet, he’s snoring under the bed. In Welsh😜

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Ki konnyk (clever dog) :dog: :smile:

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All the road name signs round where I live have the name also given in Cornish. I’m not sure if this is true for the whole of Cornwall; I’ve only lived here for six months. Anyway I rode my horse past New Lane today and it was spelt nowydh. I realised it was a th sound, as I’ve passed Red Lane (Rudh) and I’d seen road as Fordh.

Currently I’m only concentrating on speaking Cornish, but there are lessons fairly close for when the novel corona virus dies down.

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I’ve just realised the replies don’t nest here. That was a reply to the post that mentioned the two ways of spelling new.

Not everywhere, but it’s spreading — as far as I’ve heard, Cornwall Council’s policy is that when an old road sign needs replacing, it’s replaced with a bilingual one. They only do that with signs that are due for replacing anyway, so as not to get accused of “wasting money”!

It does say at the top of the post who it’s a reply to, and if you click on that name, it shows the post being replied to. What I wrote there is actually a bit out of date — the Standard Written Form went through a revision a few years ago (5 years after it was introduced) and several changes were made, so “nowydh” and “flogh” are now the official spellings in both SWF and Kernewek Kemmyn. However, while SWF is now becoming more and more accepted (I’ve switched to it in the past couple of years), there are still several other spelling systems also in use by those who prefer them, so it still gets a bit bewildering at times… :dizzy_face:

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I stayed a couple of times in a B&B in St. A. It was called The Arches. You can guess where it was located.

Not all bad though, it’s where they make Mena Dhu and Korev.

And there’s an excellent Yeth an Werin (informal Cornish conversation group) that meets at the Rann Wartha every Monday, at least under normal circumstances! :wink:

I have just finished Lesson 10 of SSIC, and it took me about a month. I thought that these plague-times would be a good chance to learn. I am just revising, so the lessons stick in my mind.

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Differences in spelling are not as much as a problem as is often made out. Read it out aloud and they all become the same language with one or two minor differences, certainly not as far apart as Welsh from North and South Wales. People who have learnt through different spelling systems meet for online Yeth an Werin Warlinen sessions and have no problem communicating. Go with the one you find easiest and read as much as possible in the others. Novels are available in virtually of the all main spelling systems by now.
SWF (M) and Kemmyn are very similar, whilst SWF(L), Kernowak Standard and UCR are also very similar. Unified and Nowedga are slightly further away.

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